elcome to Adoring Emilia Clarke, the online home for all the Emilia Clarke fans. We will provide you news, photos, in-depth information, media, fun stuff and much more on our favorite english star! You probably recognize Emilia as Daenerys Taragaryen in HBO's Game of Thrones. Her latest role was Qi'Ra in the newest Star Wars movie Solo: A Star Wars Story, and she will be seen next in the West End production of Five Times In One Night and in the thriller Above Suspicion.

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Above Suspicion

Emilia as Susan Smith
Solo: A SW Story

Emilia as Qi'Ra
Game Of Thrones

Emilia as Daenerys
Last Christmas

Emilia as Kate
Archive for the ‘Photoshoots & Portraits’ Category

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER – The English star was constantly afraid of being killed off the show, saying, “I just assumed every impostor syndrome times a million.”
With HBO’s Game of Thrones never shying from saying goodbye to characters, star Emilia Clarke admits that she was constantly afraid of being killed off the show. “On the show you have the phone call,” Clarke shared during The Hollywood Reporter’s Drama Actress Roundtable.

“You get a call from David [Benioff] and Dan [Weiss], who are the creators of the show, and everyone starts to really dread that phone call,” Clarke said, whose character survived to make it to the series finale. “That’s the kiss of death.”

“I started so green and was so incredibly grateful to be employed, I just assumed every impostor syndrome times a million,” Clarke continued. “I just assumed that every time I read the script I was going to be written off because I was just crap, and that they had had enough, and that this time was the last time.”

The actress went on to share the time she knew she had made it in Hollywood when she auctioned off the chance to watch an episode of Game of Thrones with her, only to discover that Brad Pitt had joined the bidding war. “He didn’t ultimately win,” she said, but, “it was the most ridiculous, surreal moment of my entire existence.”

(SPOILER): Clarke starred as Queen Daenerys Targaryen in the Emmy Award-winning series. Daenerys died at the hand of Jon Snow on Sunday’s series finale.

The full Drama Actress Roundtable airs July 7 on SundanceTV. Clarke stars on the roundtable along with Patricia Arquette, Christine Baranski, Danai Gurira, Niecy Nash and Michelle Williams. Follow all the Emmy season roundtables at THR.com/Roundtables.

VARIETY – Just like the millions of “Game of Thrones” fans across the globe, Emilia Clarke is devastated the HBO series has come to an end.

“Having it come to its conclusion feels utterly surreal and completely bizarre and very, very very strange,” she tells Regina Hall in an upcoming episode of Variety’s Actors on Actors.

“So much of life has happened in the 10 years,” Clarke said. “I’ve grown into a woman. I started as a child. (I mean) I was 23 but mentally, I was so green.”

Clarke says she wrapped filming on “Thrones” in August of 2017, given the show’s epic post-production work, and that it’s taken her nearly this long to come to terms with her saying goodbye to the Mother of Dragons.

“At first I was like existential ‘Who am I? Where are my dragons?’ Why or where am I driving? Where the hell are we?’ It felt really deeply emotional.”

While some of her cast mates took what memorabilia they could from set, Clarke said she simply forgot to do so.

“I deeply regret it. And I’m very annoyed,” she laughed. “And I’m really hoping the show-runners give me an egg.”

Watch the full conversation between Clarke and Hall on the next season of Actors on Actors, which airs in June on PBS SoCal. (source)

THE LOS ANGELES TIMESNote to readers: This article contains a spoiler about the series finale of “Game of Thrones.”

When Emilia Clarke finished reading the scripts for the last two episodes of “Game of Thrones,” she went for a long walk, wandering the streets of London in a stupor, trying to process the shocking fate of her character, Daenerys Targaryen, and whether she had the strength to play it. Shortly afterward, plagued by self-doubt, Clarke called her mom, the most pragmatic person she knows. She needed someone to talk her off the ledge.

Mom’s advice: You’re good and, if anything, you get to do some wicked acting. So enjoy it. “The boys [showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss] gave me a gift this season with Daenerys,” Clarke says. “They gave me a gift just giving me the part in the first place. To get the opportunity to play a girl who goes from being a naive, frightened creature to a dictator with genocidal tendencies is amazing. That’s a pretty big arc!”

Over lunch around the corner from her home in Venice and, later, in a phone call from her London residence, Clarke talked about that journey, the finale and how she handled the frightening brain aneurysms that beset her while making the show.

How did you feel when you read the finale script and you came to your last scene, when Jon Snow stabs you?
When I first read it, I read past it three times. Because what actually happens is all in the stage directions. I was reading the script and I was like, “What? Did I choke on something? What am I? Ill?” Then I read back and I’m like, “Oh. Oooooh no. Right. Brilliant. So he did it. The bastard.” It was a huge amount to digest and my response was complete shock.

What were your emotions when it came time to film it?
I don’t know what I was expecting, but it was difficult and enormously emotional. It isn’t just something I sat with for nine months. It’s a woman I lived with for a decade. And the relationship she has with Jon Snow is, I still believe, the truest, most real love she experiences in her entire life. So for that to be the way that it ends … obviously there’s a poetry to it, but there’s a huge amount of pain that comes with it. There was also something weirdly cathartic and full of closure about her journey being one of complete finality. Maybe the show goes on. But for her it absolutely doesn’t. For her, there’s an absolute full-stop. And there’s a release to that after all of the madness that happened before.

(Read the rest of the interview at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 – Los Angeles Times [+6]

FLAUNT“When I watch telly or a movie, it’s escapism. I just want to not think about my fucking life for a minute. I want to sit there, and be transported,” says Emilia Clarke, the 32-year-old English actor at the epicenter of one of the biggest, highest grossing, most culturally significant and revered shows on the planet: Game of Thrones.

17.4 million people around the world tuned into the final season premiere episode of the show, making it the most watched screening in HBO’s history. Memes have been flying across social feeds, passionate debates have ensued on who will take the Iron Throne, and bubbling excitement-meets-a saddened unwillingness to really, truly accept that the eight season-long fantasy epic has finally come to a close, has sunk in.

Game of Thrones, and the original Song of Ice and Fire novels by George R. R. Martin, is a cultural phenomenon of insurmountable proportions. It holds six Guinness World Book of Records entries, is the most awarded series in Emmy history, and has won 308 awards out of 596 nominations to date. It’s been quoted in speeches by politicians. Referenced in shows from The Simpsons to Sesame Street. Children have been born and named after its characters. Its fans are said to be the most devoted and dedicated of all, exceeding Bieber’s “Beliebers,” Gaga’s “Little Monsters,” and Star Trek’s “Trekkies.”

And now, after eight long years of the show and franchise, it’s ending. Chants of ‘Winter is Here’ float across countries, time zones, social media platform of your choice, and into the canon of entertainment history.

Escaping to fantastical worlds such as Westeros is cleary a favoured pastime of our generation. “It hit at a time when, culturally and socially, people were interested in power,” explains Clarke, who plays Daenerys Targaryen, one of the warring heirs to the epic’s Iron Throne. The original story was inspired by the War of Roses that took place in England during the 14th century. “You’ve got power, which is really fascinating, and how our world is still run to this day, then you’ve got incredibly beautifully written complex characters and sensational intrigue.”

(Read the rest of the article at the source)


Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 – Flaunt Magazine [+10]
Magazine Scans > 2019 – Flaunt (Issue 166) [+1]

ALLURE – A valley sprawls before her, rich with every color of green in the kingdom, reaching out to a twinkling city, which borders the infinite sea. Her hair (tinted not with peroxide, but tiny flecks of actual gold) glows with a radiance that makes the setting sun so jealous it hides behind the surrounding mountains, and the evening sky blushes. She is Daenerys Targaryen, Queen of the Andals, Breaker of Chains, Mother of Dragons, Khaleesi of the Great Grass Sea. Everything in sight belongs to her.

Just kidding! She is Emilia Clarke, sitting high above Beverly Hills in a glass mansion rented for a magazine cover shoot. So high up that passing aircraft rattle the bones of the house and those inside it. So high up that you can see Santa Catalina Island in the distance, peeking out from behind a curtain of fog. She laughs about something the makeup artist says, and the last of the evening light bounces off of her cheekbones and shoots into the camera lens.

We are in the sky to talk about Clarke’s reign as one of the most preeminent television actresses of our time, as Daenerys on Game of Thrones. But first, I have a few questions about her abandoned career as a jazz singer.

Clarke’s default emotion is joy — her resting heart rate seems to be just below that of someone seconds after winning a medium-expensive raffle prize — but it quickly congeals into theatrical horror when I reveal that I know that she is a casual but talented singer of jazz music.

When she was 10, Clarke was an alto in a chorus that she describes as “very churchy.” Then a substitute teacher introduced her class to jazz. “I just innately understood it,” she explains. “I was always sliding up and down the notes. Every time, the [chorus] teacher would be like, ‘Quit sliding, just sing that note and then that one and that’s it. Stop trying to fuck with it.’ Then this [jazz teacher] was like, ‘Fuck with it. That’s the point.’ ” Fast-forward a couple of decades, and Clarke was singing “The Way You Look Tonight” at the American Songbook Gala in New York, honoring Richard Plepler, erstwhile CEO of HBO. Nicole Kidman was there, too, and that is the story of Emilia Clarke, a very famous singer.

(Read the rest of the article at the source)


Magazine Scans > 2019 – Allure (June) [+1]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 – Allure [+7]

THE NEW YORK TIMES – Women all over the world are riding the tiger.

Except Emilia Clarke.

She’s riding the dragon.

The fire-and-ice fantasy world of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” may be set in feudal times, but the heady whoosh of women leaders rising on the show, as it reaches its bloody conclusion, parallels the heady whoosh of women leaders rising around the globe in the last couple of years.

All eyes are now on the fierce four: Daenerys, Cersei, Sansa and Arya. Going into its eighth and final season, the show has offered a primer in how a female leader must act differently than a male leader in a world run predominantly by men — the double standards, the way an action can be perceived in very different ways depending on whether it’s a man or a woman undertaking it.

“The whole show is just a discussion on power,” Clarke tells me in an interview at the Mandarin Oriental before the premiere at Radio City Music Hall. “Because the Iron Throne is representative of complete and consuming power and what that does to someone. It’s fascinating, what I’ve found about the sacrifices that you make and what you get out of it as a result. Ultimately, if you get on the throne, what are you really getting?

She cites her beautiful and icy Lannister rival, Queen Cersei (played by Lena Headey), who has lost her three children to murder and suicide and driven off Jaime, her brother/lover, who grew disgusted by her rapaciousness.

“Cersei proves that you’re not getting that much,” Clarke says. “You’re getting a lot of loneliness, pain, critiques.”

(Read the rest of the article at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 – The New York Times [+2]