elcome to Adoring Emilia Clarke, the online home for all the Emilia Clarke fans. We will provide you news, photos, in-depth information, media, fun stuff and much more on our favorite english star! You probably recognize Emilia as Daenerys Taragaryen in HBO's Game of Thrones. Her latest role was Qi'Ra in the newest Star Wars movie Solo: A Star Wars Story, and she will be seen next in the West End production of Five Times In One Night and in the thriller Above Suspicion.

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Above Suspicion

Emilia as Susan Smith
Solo: A SW Story

Emilia as Qi'Ra
Game Of Thrones

Emilia as Daenerys
Last Christmas

Emilia as Kate
Archive for the ‘Interviews’ Category

THE SUNDAY TIMES – Emilia Clarke says she views herself primarily as a stage actress, which is a little weird when you consider that she has only appeared in one play professionally before, and it was an absolute turkey. Or, as the 33-year-old star of Game of Thrones says, in her jolly British way, it was “terrible, awful, awful! Bad! That was a bad show!” The piece was Breakfast at Tiffany’s on Broadway in 2013, and it’s safe to say Clarke’s Holly Golightly did not enchant. “I’ll never forget, someone said to me after press night the only thing they liked was the cat.”

If Clarke relays this with surprising good humour, this is part temperament, part experience. For one thing, in person she is relentlessly chipper and pukka. Whereas on HBO’s mega-fantasy series Game of Thrones, she grew in stature as Daenerys Targaryen, a still, dignified stateswoman (until that end), in real life she is a goofy motormouth chatterbox, always eager to catch the joke at her expense. And she is no stranger to what we shall politely call “the mixed review”. She has known some drubbings, whether for that Broadway show, or films such as Last Christmas or Terminator Genisys, or indeed the final series of GoT, which — euphemism alert! — didn’t quite turn out the way everybody wanted.

Luckily she never reads reviews. “Because if it’s really, really good, someone will tell you. And if it’s really, really bad — some f***** will tell you.”

(Read the rest of the article at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2020 – The Sunday Times [+1]

THE OBSERVER – Emilia Clarke had a headache. It was 2011, just before Valentine’s Day and just after she’d wrapped on the first series of Game of Thrones, playing Daenerys Targaryen, Breaker of Chains, Mother of Dragons. She didn’t yet know, as she crawled into the locker room of her local gym in north London and vomited bile into the toilet, that Game of Thrones would run for seven further seasons, break Emmy-award records for most wins for a scripted television series and for a drama, be named one of the greatest TV shows of all time, and quickly come to define her. But there was much she didn’t know.

She didn’t know that at 24 she had suffered a life-threatening stroke, a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) caused by bleeding into the space surrounding the brain. She didn’t know, as she lay on the floor repeating lines from Game of Thrones in order to test her memory, that a third of SAH patients die immediately, or that those who survive require urgent treatment to avoid a second, often fatal bleed. She didn’t know there was another swollen blood vessel in her brain, which had doubled in size by the time she finished filming season three. She didn’t know that one day, eight years later, over biscuits on her pink sofa, she would be smiling with the dark realisation that her stroke was one of the best things that could have happened to her.

Her pink sofa is in her pink house, which is also green and blue and muted shades of rust, and has a secret bar hidden in a courtyard shed, and an outdoor screening room heated by a wood-burning stove. To walk into her living room, where one corner is painted with a symbol relating to her mum, another to her late dad, and a third with a meaningful dragon, is to enter the cosiest corner of Clarke’s mind. By the stairs, horsehair is visible in the plaster; the walls are stripped back to the bone. She shows me round with a raw sort of glee, a sense that her comfort and safety are bound into the details: the friends’ art on the walls, the “single girl’s” bedroom. She moved in after Game of Thrones; in this and many ways, her life can be cleanly dissected into before and after.

Before, Clarke, now 33, who grew up in Oxfordshire, had appeared in a single episode of the daytime soap Doctors. She was ambitious, optimistic and relentlessly cheerful. After, after Game of Thrones, and the death of her father, which shook her family, as did her life-threatening stroke, she is sitting on her pink sofa and contemplating a decade that changed her.

(Read the rest of the article at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 – The Observer [+3]

THE LOS ANGELES TIMESNote to readers: This article contains a spoiler about the series finale of “Game of Thrones.”

When Emilia Clarke finished reading the scripts for the last two episodes of “Game of Thrones,” she went for a long walk, wandering the streets of London in a stupor, trying to process the shocking fate of her character, Daenerys Targaryen, and whether she had the strength to play it. Shortly afterward, plagued by self-doubt, Clarke called her mom, the most pragmatic person she knows. She needed someone to talk her off the ledge.

Mom’s advice: You’re good and, if anything, you get to do some wicked acting. So enjoy it. “The boys [showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss] gave me a gift this season with Daenerys,” Clarke says. “They gave me a gift just giving me the part in the first place. To get the opportunity to play a girl who goes from being a naive, frightened creature to a dictator with genocidal tendencies is amazing. That’s a pretty big arc!”

Over lunch around the corner from her home in Venice and, later, in a phone call from her London residence, Clarke talked about that journey, the finale and how she handled the frightening brain aneurysms that beset her while making the show.

How did you feel when you read the finale script and you came to your last scene, when Jon Snow stabs you?
When I first read it, I read past it three times. Because what actually happens is all in the stage directions. I was reading the script and I was like, “What? Did I choke on something? What am I? Ill?” Then I read back and I’m like, “Oh. Oooooh no. Right. Brilliant. So he did it. The bastard.” It was a huge amount to digest and my response was complete shock.

What were your emotions when it came time to film it?
I don’t know what I was expecting, but it was difficult and enormously emotional. It isn’t just something I sat with for nine months. It’s a woman I lived with for a decade. And the relationship she has with Jon Snow is, I still believe, the truest, most real love she experiences in her entire life. So for that to be the way that it ends … obviously there’s a poetry to it, but there’s a huge amount of pain that comes with it. There was also something weirdly cathartic and full of closure about her journey being one of complete finality. Maybe the show goes on. But for her it absolutely doesn’t. For her, there’s an absolute full-stop. And there’s a release to that after all of the madness that happened before.

(Read the rest of the interview at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 – Los Angeles Times [+6]

THE NEW YORK TIMES – Women all over the world are riding the tiger.

Except Emilia Clarke.

She’s riding the dragon.

The fire-and-ice fantasy world of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” may be set in feudal times, but the heady whoosh of women leaders rising on the show, as it reaches its bloody conclusion, parallels the heady whoosh of women leaders rising around the globe in the last couple of years.

All eyes are now on the fierce four: Daenerys, Cersei, Sansa and Arya. Going into its eighth and final season, the show has offered a primer in how a female leader must act differently than a male leader in a world run predominantly by men — the double standards, the way an action can be perceived in very different ways depending on whether it’s a man or a woman undertaking it.

“The whole show is just a discussion on power,” Clarke tells me in an interview at the Mandarin Oriental before the premiere at Radio City Music Hall. “Because the Iron Throne is representative of complete and consuming power and what that does to someone. It’s fascinating, what I’ve found about the sacrifices that you make and what you get out of it as a result. Ultimately, if you get on the throne, what are you really getting?

She cites her beautiful and icy Lannister rival, Queen Cersei (played by Lena Headey), who has lost her three children to murder and suicide and driven off Jaime, her brother/lover, who grew disgusted by her rapaciousness.

“Cersei proves that you’re not getting that much,” Clarke says. “You’re getting a lot of loneliness, pain, critiques.”

(Read the rest of the article at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 – The New York Times [+2]

BRITISH VOGUE – From the icy shores of Westeros to a Roman trattoria for her Dolce & Gabbana The Only One campaign, actress Emilia Clarke is used to switching up her beauty routine. As the leading lady on Game of Thrones, much of Clarke’s recent professional career has existed in extreme conditions and she’s developed a multi-step skincare routine to cope with it. And as comfortable in Targaryen blonde as she is her natural rich brunette, the switching of her hair colour has gone on to inform her make-up options too, on and off the red carpet. Here, she talks Vogue through her fragrance journey and why she will always remove her make-up before bed.

On skincare
I’m strict with SPF everyday. All day everyday. Take care of that skin. I get pigmentation really easily so I’ve got to be really careful, and I burn really easily. We’re all woke now aren’t we, woke to the SPF! If I’m filming in extreme conditions, I just up my moisturiser and maybe add an oil. I don’t like putting too much stuff on my skin, but I’ve just found the joys of a toner that slightly exfoliates. Get those AHAs in. I only need a little bit because it’s best not to do too much when you’re young. No need! And I literally just put the most mini mini amount of eye cream on too, but then rub it in like mad.

On British style
Well, traditionally it’s the English rose but at the moment we are doing pretty well in having a different voice and a much more inclusive, diverse, definition of what “beautiful” actually is. And I like that, as no one beauty looks alike. I like that British style is edgy and it’s cool and it’s different. We are leaps and bounds away from the traditional, twee vibe that the English rose traditionally is known for being.

On fragrance
My dad went to Paris when I was really little and I asked him to bring back some rose perfume. When I smell rose today, it brings me back to that place. I’m not someone who applies a lot of fragrance. I spray at the beginning of the day and that’s it. And it will last me throughout! I’ll always do one in my hair and if you put it up, and then take it down, halfway through the day you’re like “mmm! I don’t even need to respray this!”

On travel beauty essentials
I always pack my full kit and I can’t do it any other way: Shiseido cleanser, moisturiser and eye cream. Twice a day every day. I can be blackout drunk and I’ll still take my make-up off. I get nightmares when I sleep in my make-up; it’s the weirdest thing.

(Read the rest of the interview at the source)

Various Campaigns & Modelling > 2018 – Dolce&Gabbana ‘The Only One’ > Promotional [+1]

HARPER’S BAZAAR – She may be a huge Hollywood face, but British actress Emilia Clarke has a refreshingly real feel for beauty. While enjoying the star treatment that comes with the job (“transformative” facials and anti-ageing silk pillow cases – don’t you use them?), Clarke still follows her mother’s sensible skincare routine and reaches for a trusty red lipstick to get a confidence boost, like the rest of us. Quite unlike others, though, Clarke is fronting the new Dolce & Gabbana fragrance, The Only One. Her second role for the iconic fashion house’s beauty brand comes with a captivating campaign video in which she acts and sings, beautifully. To celebrate, we caught up with Clarke to discover her beauty philosophy, and the products she can’t live without.

HB: What was the decision behind your current haircut?

EC: “Yes, it is quite short – because my hair was, like, dying! So I’ve cut it a little bit shorter. It’s almost the shortest it’s been. I’m honestly trying to grow out the blonde, because it’s just killed my hair, and I miss having nice hair! I do like the length but I wish my hair was longer. I do bloody love long hair, but then I’m always dreaming of cutting it all off and having a pixie cut – but I don’t know that my face could take it.”

HB: So we shouldn’t necessarily expect that to happen?

EC: “Exactly!”

HB: Do you get recognised more as a blonde?

EC: “I feel like being this blonde is kind of like you’re constantly wearing an accessory. So, you can wear all black and be like ‘I tried! There you go’, whereas when you’re brunette and wearing all black it’s like, ‘meh’, do you know what I mean? But it’s also very difficult because I get recognised a lot more, and I’m less good at dealing with that. So I’m thinking ‘ah, I’ll go back brown and then maybe be a bit more incognito again!’. You clock anyone who’s got this hair colour anyway, so you see someone with peroxide blonde hair you look, and then [people] go ‘oh my god it’s that chick from the show with the dragons’ – and then I’m running!”

HB: As well as cutting it, what are your other strategies for maintaining your hair’s condition?

EC: “Olaplex – which I’m sure people bang on about all the time – it’s really good. Sometimes I sleep in it. There’s this other amazing brand called Iles Formula, and that shampoo and conditioner is amazing. And then the Elasticizer, by Philip Kingsley, brilliant. I’m taking it all!”

(Read the rest of the interview at the source)

Various Campaigns & Modelling > 2018 – Dolce&Gabbana ‘The Only One’ > Promotional [+1]
Various Campaigns & Modelling > 2018 – Dolce&Gabbana ‘The Only One’ > Backstage [+1]