elcome to Adoring Emilia Clarke, the online home for all the Emilia Clarke fans. We will provide you news, photos, in-depth information, media, fun stuff and much more on our favorite english star! You probably recognize Emilia as Daenerys Taragaryen in HBO's Game of Thrones. Her latest role was Qi'Ra in the newest Star Wars movie Solo: A Star Wars Story, and she will be seen next in the West End production of Five Times In One Night and in the thriller Above Suspicion.

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Above Suspicion

Emilia as Susan Smith
Solo: A SW Story

Emilia as Qi'Ra
Game Of Thrones

Emilia as Daenerys
Last Christmas

Emilia as Kate
Archive for the ‘News & Articles’ Category

THE NEW YORK TIMES – Women all over the world are riding the tiger.

Except Emilia Clarke.

She’s riding the dragon.

The fire-and-ice fantasy world of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” may be set in feudal times, but the heady whoosh of women leaders rising on the show, as it reaches its bloody conclusion, parallels the heady whoosh of women leaders rising around the globe in the last couple of years.

All eyes are now on the fierce four: Daenerys, Cersei, Sansa and Arya. Going into its eighth and final season, the show has offered a primer in how a female leader must act differently than a male leader in a world run predominantly by men — the double standards, the way an action can be perceived in very different ways depending on whether it’s a man or a woman undertaking it.

“The whole show is just a discussion on power,” Clarke tells me in an interview at the Mandarin Oriental before the premiere at Radio City Music Hall. “Because the Iron Throne is representative of complete and consuming power and what that does to someone. It’s fascinating, what I’ve found about the sacrifices that you make and what you get out of it as a result. Ultimately, if you get on the throne, what are you really getting?

She cites her beautiful and icy Lannister rival, Queen Cersei (played by Lena Headey), who has lost her three children to murder and suicide and driven off Jaime, her brother/lover, who grew disgusted by her rapaciousness.

“Cersei proves that you’re not getting that much,” Clarke says. “You’re getting a lot of loneliness, pain, critiques.”

(Read the rest of the article at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 – The New York Times [+2]

HARPER’S BAZAAR – Even the Mother of Dragons gets sick. A slightly congested Emilia Clarke mentions she’s getting over the flu as we talk on the phone days after the Academy Awards. Apparently, going to the Oscars and hitting up Beyonce’s private after party didn’t help with her recovery. (“I basically cried at her,” she gushes over the experience.) But what’s one night of feeling ill on the red carpet when you’ve spent months filming battle scenes in wintery Northern Ireland in the most grueling conditions? If Khaleesi could make it to Winterfell alive, then Clarke could survive the climax of awards season with the flu.

Throughout Clarke’s nearly decade-long tenure as queen Daenerys Targaryen on Game of Thrones, we’ve seen her walk through fire unburnt, devour a horse heart, and fly on the back of dragons. But in the fantasy juggernaut’s eighth and final season, which premieres April 14, Dany will find herself in completely new territory: at Winterfell with the Starks, on the brink of a war against the undead.

“She starts feeling pretty cocksure and confident, and then stuff happens,” Clarke tells BAZAAR.com of Dany’s arrival North and her first encounter with Sansa Stark (Sophie Turner), which HBO teased in early promos.

Clarke’s casting as the platinum-haired heir to the Iron Throne was first announced in 2010. She’s grown a lot since then; Season 1 Emilia and Season 8 Emilia are “two incredibly different women,” Clarke says.

As she moves on from the Thrones world, she already has other projects lined up, like the holiday rom-com Last Christmas (co-written by Emma Thompson) opposite Henry Golding. She previously hit the big screen in 2018’s Solo: A Star Wars Story, 2016’s Me Before You, and 2014’s Terminator Genisys. Clarke also landed a covetable role in the beauty sphere, as the face of Dolce & Gabbana’s The Only One fragrance, available now. In the ads, she’s a charming Italian chanteuse who breaks into song over dinner in Rome—a far cry from Khaleesi.

(Read the rest of the article at the source)

Emilia is going to be featured in the next issue of Le Parisien Week-End with a brand new photoshoot and interview! The article is, of course, in France. I’m not able to translate it but if anyone wants, I’ll gladly post it – with the due credit.

LE PARISIEN – Mardi 3 avril. Au troisième étage de l’hôtel chic The New York Edition, au coeur de Manhattan. Teint rose, lèvres pulpeuses et sourcils fournis, une petite silhouette de 1,57 mètre s’avance vers nous. L’actrice britannique Emilia Clarke, 31 ans, crève l’écran dans Solo : A Star Wars Story. Ce dixième film estampillé La Guerre des étoiles, en salle le 23 mai, se concentre sur la jeunesse d’Han Solo, personnage culte de la saga intergalactique.

Son nom ne vous dit peut-être pas grand chose. La comédienne est surtout connue pour incarner, depuis 2011, Daenerys Targaryen (dite « Khaleesi » ou « Mère des dragons »), l’un des rôles principaux de la série médiévalo-fantastique Game of Thrones.

Pour ceux qui n’y ont jamais jeté un coup d’oeil, piqûre de rappel. Daenerys, héritière déchue, réduite à l’esclavage par une bande de sauvages, va peu à peu se libérer de ses chaînes en prenant la tête d’une armée d’opprimés. Les épisodes s’enchaînent e tla jeune femme, fine stratège militaire, s’affirme comme une meneuse d’hommes et de dragons (oui, oui). Son but : briguer le fameux Trône de fer.

(Read the rest of the article at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 – Le Parisien Portraits [+8]

THE TELEGRAPH – Emilia Clarke walks into a suite at Claridge’s, a gaggle of publicists and agents surrounding her, with the kind of poise that you would expect from a queen.

To the tens of millions of fans of Game of Thrones, the show that catapulted her to fame only a year out of drama school, it’s a not unfamiliar scene.

Although of course, as Daenerys Targaryen, the all-powerful, slave-freeing queen of the show, it would be some kind of windswept castle or ancient pyramid, and her retinue would be in armour.

Even her newly blonde hair is apt (until now she’s worn a wig on the show). Like the character she plays, Emilia’s is a story of success against the odds (of which more later), but there the similarities end.

At 31, the English rose couldn’t be less like the prickly queen she plays (full title: Daenerys Stormborn of House Targaryen, rightful heir to the Iron Throne, rightful Queen of the Andals and the First Men, Protector of the Seven Kingdoms, the Mother of Dragons, the Khaleesi of the Great Grass Sea, the Unburnt, the Breaker of Chains… or just Dany for short).

Emilia is funny, light-hearted and, that entrance aside, a million miles from grand. She’s much more like the carefree, dancing girl she plays in the new campaign for the Dolce & Gabbana fragrance The One. (When the brand asked if she would be its new face, ‘I was like, “Well, yeah. Duh.”’)

In the past, Emilia has had to deal with uncomfortable questions about how she, as a woman, justified the arguably gratuitous female nudity and gruesome violence for which Game of Thrones initially made headlines.

(Read the rest of the article at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 – The Telegraph [+2]

ROLLING STONE – On a recent Monday afternoon, the queen was taking her tea. “Could I just be more English than sense itself and get an Earl Grey?” asks Emilia Clarke from the deep folds of a leather chesterfield sofa in the so-called Drawing Room of her downtown Manhattan hotel. The young waiter is only too happy to oblige, though it’s unclear whether he knows he’s in the presence of the Khaleesi, Mother of Dragons and rightful ruler of the Seven Kingdoms.
That being said, six seasons into HBO’s Game of Thrones – a cultural phenomenon that plays in no fewer than 170 countries, has inspired countless tattoos and baby namings, and has proved to be the network’s most popular show of all time, with a seventh season set to premiere July 16th – it’s more than likely that he does. Clarke smiles and tucks her feet up under her. “I’m crap at getting recognized,” she confides. “People are like, ‘Oh, hey!’ And I’m like” – she starts yelling – “‘God! Oh, hi! I’m sorry!’ “

When I first met Clarke, back in 2013, the actress was 26, still relatively unknown when not wearing her signature GoT blond wig, and not likely to compare herself to her warrior-queen character. She’d still seemed slightly in awe of the fact that she’d gotten the job at all, which was only her third acting role ever. “I’m all too painfully aware of how quickly this can disappear,” she’d told me when we’d met in a Broadway dressing room, where she was rehearsing to play Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

Four years later, Clarke has maintained her hallmarks – wry humor and ample good will, among them – but it’s clear we’re in another realm. Even in a messy bun and frayed blue jeans, she now comes across as a sort of beacon – poised, almost glowing, a point to which all other attention can’t help but be drawn. In other words, she has a way of commanding the room that seems downright Khaleesi-esque. She has, after all, now spent the bulk of her adult life embodying one of our culture’s most striking images of female domination, while eloquently explaining her onscreen nudity in broadly feminist terms. She’s turned 30 (of which she says, “I was just quietly panicking”). She’s graced the big screen multiple times, including opposite Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator Genisys. And, like the rest of us, she’s lived through Brexit and the ascendency of Trump, or, as she puts it, “ ’16. The fucking year where everything shit happened.” So, times have changed – for better and for worse.

“You can’t expect everyone to just stop doing their jobs and march every day of their lives,” she says of the volatile political climate. “But we’ve got to be in this shit for the long game.” And for Clarke, being “in this shit” means not being OK with a lot of what goes on around her – a realization that grew and amplified “in a [post-Brexit] era where you suddenly go, ‘What do you mean my views are so vastly different from my neighbor?’ ” Like, for example, her views on being one of the few women on any given set. Or the fact that women consistently have fewer lines than their male counterparts, even when they’re playing the “lead.” Or that actresses must arrive for hair and makeup hours before most of the male stars.

“I feel so naive for saying it, but it’s like dealing with racism,” she says. “You’re aware of it, and you’re aware of it, but one day, you go, ‘Oh, my God, it’s everywhere!’ Like you suddenly wake up to it and you go, ‘Wait a fucking second, are you . . . are you treating me different because I’ve got a pair of tits? Is that actually happening?’ It took me a really long time to see that I do get treated differently. But I look around, and that’s my daily life.”

(Read the rest of the interview at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 – Rolling Stone [+1]
Magazine Scans > 2017 – Rolling Stone (July 13-27) [+1]
Game of Thrones > Season 7 (2017) > Episode Stills > Unsorted Stills [+1]

STYLE MAGAZINE – For 25 minutes, the actor best known as ethereal blonde Daenerys Targaryen on HBO’s Game of Thrones has been chatting breezily over the phone from her hometown of London, but now she chooses her words carefully. Emilia Clarke pauses. “That’s a really hard question,” she says, gathering her thoughts.

The subject: what character she most identifies with from ‘90s sitcom Friends. “I love Rachel,” she says. “We all want to be Rachel. But there’s something about Monica that is so reassuringly neurotic.” The true identity of her Friends spirit animal has been a subject of much debate with her best friend, Lola Frears, the daughter of Florence Foster Jenkins’ director Stephen Frears. “I feel like we both want to be Rachel but are both a bit Monica,” Clarke admits.

As proudly educated as Clarke is in the preposterously detailed world of Westeros built by George R. R. Martin in his “A Song of Ice and Fire” novels and refined by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss on the HBO phenomenon, returning July 16, Clarke is at least as big of a television nerd for the millennial must-see TV staple Friends. She outed herself as a Friends superfan on Graham Norton’s U.K. talk show last year, where she appeared alongside Matt LeBlanc. “I have one slight request for you,” she said to him as the cameras rolled. “Would you be able to ask me how I’m doing?” As LeBlanc mouthed Joey Tribbiani’s signature “How you doin’?”, she broke into nervous giggles.

Yes, Clarke knows what it’s like to be that kind of a fan, which is probably a very good thing considering her filmography, which includes such obsessed-over roles as Sarah Connor in 2015’s Terminator Genisys, an as-yet-unnamed character in 2018’s Han Solo prequel, and, most famously, Khaleesi herself on Game of Thrones.

The 30-year-old grew up in Berkshire outside of London, her father a sound engineer for the theatre and her mother a vice-president of marketing. She won her role in Game of Thrones in 2010 after the pilot had already been shot with British actress Tamzin Merchant playing Daenerys. (In an inauspicious debut, the pilot episode would be 90% reshot). Her brief résumé at that point included a guest-role on British soap Doctors and the direct-to-DVD Jurassic Park rip-off Triassic Attack, which no one has seen, including, according to last report, Clarke herself.

(Read the rest of the article at the source)